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20121201
20121231
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. cal, cooksville, tennessee, independent caller. go ahead, cal. caller: yeah. about gun control. the mother of the mentally ill boy didn't control her guns. she has a mentally ill child, takes him out, according to the reports on tv, took him out and then taught him how to shoot these rifles and pistols and then left these guns available for him to use if he wanted to and that's where the gun control should have been with her like the other gentlemen said who got a couple of -- gentleman said who got a couple of calls back. and then he came to the school and shot up in the door and bust out the glass and everything. and he was -- boy, he had all the protection, you know, that he needed, but the principal didn't have any protection. if she would have had a gun she knew that somebody was coming in because she heard the shots. she knew that. and she was helpless. she didn't have a gun. if she had a gun, she very well may have stopped this guy, knowing that he had a gun, probably would have shot him and saved all these kids lives. host: all right, cal, we're going to talk about gun
on my time. i want to get specific. i've been theetret cal all morning. i gave one specific example of the shrimp supply chain. i want to say to that the entire logic and reasoning of why that shrimp exists in bangladesh, it is only 18 years old and that is because of climate change. rising sea levels and then the landowners realize that shrimp is less labor intensive than rice. if you have tried to plant rise before it takes a lot of people. all right, so we talked about the past, and the present so i want to get specific and look at a case study. this will illustrate many of the points i have tried to discuss. this case study will be the oldest which is still persisting today then is bonded labor. so bonded labor, how did it work in centuries past? well, i provide an overview in my new book that just came out, i hope you guys get a chance to read it and send me your feedback. it is based on a credit labor agreement. what that means is in the past you had large numbers of landless pee zandted. so they had to borter their labor as a means of survival. these lasted for the lifetime.
manager on how they view amtrak's work with california and cal trans. they are concerned with changes to state support services program, section 209 of the passenger rail investment and improvement act, the priia. that forces the state of california to pay $20 million that are going to be taken out of that budget for them. it runs along the border of my area which is the alameda corridor east which is a train transportation that brings in to the rest of the nation. we are watching the reorganization of amtrak, making sure it doesn't hinder any state partnerships. these are critical because they are the ones who will in the end work with the local communities to ensure that we get more people to utilize it. we are pleased that the reorg has created an executive level position of general manager. i look forward to meeting that individual and working with him. it's a very positive step and the states provide 50% of the revenues to amtrak. we must have a senior amtrak level position to work with state on their programs. and this is especially important, section 209 of priia negatively imp
the leon and sylvia and the institute at cal state university at monterey bay. to promote public service. he served eight terms in congress. rising to chairman of the house budget committee in 1989. then president clinton's director of the office of management and budget to replaced by me in welcoming to the national press club secretary defense leon panetta. [applause] >> thank you very much, theresa, for that kind introduction. thank you for the introduction to be here today. i look forward to the opportunity to go back and pick walnuts back in california. told this story before but it makes the point. when i was young, my father when he first planted that walnut orchard as a group, he would go around and shake each of the branches. my brother and i would be underneath collecting the walnuts. when i got elected to congress, my italian father said you have been well trained to go to washington. because you have been dodging nuts all your life. [laughter] [applause] it was great training. i have had the opportunity to be here at the press club in some of my past jobs as a member of congr
the boxes and the elopes and at that point, cal to see who has won. >host: c-span will be covering the meetings in ohio and north carolina and coverage starts at noon eastern time with the ohio electoral college. 53rd meeting in columbus. you can watch the proceedings live from the ohio statehouse senate chamber on c-span 3. we will also be watching what carolina as it's a mature college meets and it is all on our website, c-span.org. other to find out more. james thurber, does anything unexpected happen when the of the torah, as day occurs? was of the voting process in november. our electoral college delegates committed? can anything different happen? guest: yes, something different happened. in 24 states they are required to vote the ticket that they are running on, these electors. so, they cannot be a faithless elector. we had nine cases since 1920 of them. one of them was actually here in washington, d.c., in 2000. she did not vote at all in protest over the fact that washington, d.c., does not have representation in congress. host: if you would like to talk with james thurber
and justice for all. the speaker: this is the day for the private cal der and without objection the private calendar will be called after one-minute speeches today. the chair will entertain up to 15 requests for one-minute speeches. for what purpose does the gentleman from south carolina rise? mr. wilson: mr. speaker, i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute and to revise and extend my remarks. the speaker: without objection, so ordered. mr. wilson: mr. speaker, last friday's massacre at sandy hook elementary school in newtown, connecticut, was heartbreaking. americans are devastated as reports emerge detailing how a deranged individual murdered 20 innocent children, six heroic faculty members, and his mother before turning the gun on himself. as a husband to a former school teacher, a father, a grandfather and an american, my thoughts and prayers are with the teachers, families, children and first responders involved in last friday's school shooting. our hearts go out to the newtown community as we mourn this kind of senseless horrific violence has no place in american s
as a at the washington times. but our next call comes from cal in tennessee on our republican line. caller: the tax increases are not enough. when you look at 1 $3 trillion over 10 years -- this president over the last -- when you look at $1.30 trillion olver 10 years -- over 10 years, we have spent $4.60 trillion or $4.70 trillion every year. what we need is more cuts in programs so we actually have more. we need $4.60 trillion in cuts to programs. if we are going to be back on the fiscal plan we honestly need. this president was elected by people who were already democrats in 2008 and 2012. he did not have a hard time getting reelected. we made a mistake about electing this guy for sure. guest: the caller has a lot of good numbers. these are rough, but about $2.30 trillion in revenue. last, we only had $1 trillion in deficits. his point is correct. the problem is you have the government taking in 60% of gross domestic product in tax revenue and spending between 23% or 24% in gdp in spending. we are borrowing 40 cents on every dollar that we stand. that has to close. i mentioned the gdp figures be
. kim works with the boston symphony and we get a lot of classic cal music in the house. we have 11-year-old twin boys and they have their preferences, maybe it's because they're playing most of the popular music i'm hearing in the house i have such a negative take on it. >> do you have an ipod? >> no, an ipad. >> do you listen to music on there? >> no, i listen on cd and vinyl. >> they have said taylor swift is named after you. what do you think of her music? >> i like her music. and i like the name too. i do think she is a creative singer song writer. she's a remarkable marketing phenomenon and if she can survive that. and it's a hard thing to survive i think. but she seems to have a very clear head on her shoulders and i think if anyone can, she can make it through and continue to evolve as an artist because it's sort of the marketing hit is if you're lucky enough to be successful, that particular passage that an artist has to make, if he's lucky enough or she's lucky enough can be a real jarring life changing event. it can really shake you up, going from being very private to very pu
with the boston symphony and we get a lot of classic cal music in the house. we have 11-year-old twin boys and they have their preferences, maybe it's because they're playing most of the popular music i'm hearing in the house i have such a negative take on it. >> do you have an i pod? >> no an ipad. >> do you listen to music on there? >> no i listen on cd and vinyl. >> they have said taylor swift is named after you. what do you think of her music? >> i like her music. and i like the name too. i do think she is a creative singer song writer. she's a remarkable marketing phenomenon and if she can survive that. and it's a hard thing to survive i think. but she seems to have a very clear head on her shoulders and i think if anyone can, she can make it through and continue to evolve as an artist because it's sort of the marketing hit is if you're lucky enough to be successful, that particular passage that an artist has to make, if he's lucky enough or she's lucky enough can be a real jarring life changing event. it can really shake you up, going from being very private to very public. >> many p
directed the leon and sylvia and the institute at cal state university at monterey bay. to promote public service. he served eight terms in congress. rising to chairman of the house budget committee in 1989. then'pressing s director of the office of management and budget -- then president clinton' director of the office of management and budget to replaced by me in welcoming to the national press club secretary defense leon panetta. [applause] >> thank you very much, theresa, for that kind introduction. thank you for the introduction to be here today. i look forward to the opportunity to go back and pick walnuts back in california. told this story before but it makes the point. when i was young, my father when he first planted that walnut orchard as a group, he would go around and shake each of the branches. my brother and i would be underneath collecting the walnuts. when i got elected to congress, my italian father said you have been well trained to go to washington. because you have been dodging that's all your life. -- nuts all your life. [laughter] [applause] it was great training. i
on to cal on the republicans line in tennessee. what do you think of the fiscal cliff and where the negotiations are so far? >> i think they ought to go over the fiscal cliff. we have people like that that are on the government bill too long. they are sucking the tit of the federal government. i think everyone should pay their fair share. we have almost a $17 billion national debt. not only, the rich but everyone should pay their fair share. we also need some spending cuts too. $3 for every $1. if you don't do this we're going top find ourselfs in a situation -- you want to talk about unemployment, we're not going to be in a recession we're going to be in a depression. if we don't do this now, what are we going to do when the debt is at $23 trillion. what are we going to do then? >> we're going to bring you president obama's remark again shortly. we're taking a if you more calls. the numbers are on your screen and let us know what you think of the fiscal cliff negotiations so far. brian is on the independent line. go ahead. >> yes, ma'am. we don't have a revenue problem. it's a
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11